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Official Positions

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February 2010 Sales Tax for Public Transit

The JCRC recognizes the importance of a strong and comprehensive system of public transportation, including buses and light rail.

Public transit provides access and mobility for all who live in, work in or visit our community. For those who are elderly, of limited economic means and for people with disabilities, public transit may provide the only practicable means of getting to work, school, medical appointments, shopping, recreational facilities and other places.

A well-functioning mass transit system is vital to the economic health of our community. Its efficient and widespread utilization will strengthen the region’s energy security by gradually reducing our dependence on foreign oil. It will have a net positive effect on the environment by reducing the region’s harmful emissions, providing a cleaner way to move people and taking cars off the road.

In furtherance of these interests, the JCRC shall take the following action steps:

• The JCRC supports and endorses the ½ of one cent sales tax proposal to fund public transit which will be on the ballot in St. Louis County in April 2010, and shall work to advocate passage of the sales tax proposal. St. Louis City already has passed a similar proposal.
• The JCRC shall become a member and active participant in the Greater St. Louis Transit Alliance, a growing coalition of organizations working to improve and expand public transit throughout the region.
• The JCRC shall meet with Metro St. Louis as part of Metro’s ongoing long-range planning process for public transportation in the St. Louis metropolitan area to help insure that future public transit systems meet the needs of the Jewish Community and others in the larger community.
• Recognizing the regressive nature of sales taxes and the increased burden they place on low-income families, the JCRC, with respect to efforts to generate funding for public transit subsequent to the April 2010 ballot measure, will encourage public officials to explore funding means other than sales taxes.

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